Monthly Archives: avril 2015

Contribution de Monsieur Aissaoui « I have just returned from Paris »

I have just returned from France where I participated in the spring meeting of the Paris Energy Club to brainstorm on the following:
•             The future of transportation fuels;
•             The changing geopolitics of energy;
•             Current energy-related issues.
As usual, the Club’s social evening, which was sponsored by IFP Energy Nouvelles, included a taste of Paris’ cultural and culinary distinctions.
The following three points constitute my personal take of the Club’s full-day discussion, which was conducted under Chatham House rule of non-attribution.
First, the transportation sector – across all transport modes – remains largely dominated by oil with road vehicles continuing to be powered almost exclusively by internal-combustion engines (ICEs) that are fuelled by petroleum products. However, we realized that signs of changes are ubiquitous – from continuing improvement in fleet-wide fuel economy, to alternative fuels, to rapidly evolving technology for electric cars. In the latter field, while long-range electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids remain very much in play, the smart car market is growing rapidly, with the extraordinary emergence of Tesla having the most serious impact on traditional automotive. Progress is expected to be even more spectacular when looking at the way digital technologies will drive mobility in the future. Our attention was invited to the fact that there are already examples of innovation such as the one supported by the so-called GAFA (Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon) that are making their mark on the way people travel, particularly in urban cities. Despite the huge uncertainties associated with disruptive technologies and innovation industries, the potential threat to oil is real and could be far-reaching.
Second, a new geopolitics of energy has emerged in the wake of the dramatic shift in energy investment and trade of recent years with a consequent reshaping of international politics. We first discussed, but passed over undecided, the question of whether or not OPEC (and Saudi Arabia) can regain their role as global swing producers in face of shale oil’s incremental economics, lean structure and flexible business model. As we shifted focus to the complex dynamics in Eurasia, we noted how, “East of Baku”, China and Russia are calling the shots and wondered what the Western world could do to balance Beijing and Moscow, hopefully through win-win propositions to reduce geopolitical tensions. We further took note of President Xi’s “One Belt One Road” strategy – probably one of China’s most important foreign policy initiatives – and its declared ambition of contributing to the development of China and the rest of the world in the areas of energy, trade and culture. The energy security implications of the initiative (the energy connectivity along both the Silk Road Economic Belt One and the 21 century Maritime Silk Road call for major investments in energy infrastructure), could lead to a more assertive role of China in global energy security.
Third, in discussing current and upcoming issues, we focused on how Big Oil is coping with the price collapse and what is at stake at the Paris December climate summit. In past depressed oil market environments, IOCs bought their way out of trouble through mergers. Until recently this was considered unlikely to happen again on the ground that the last such mergers – at the end of the 1990s and early 2000s – failed to create new opportunities for long-term growth. But Shell’s just-announced acquisition of BG has come as no surprise to the better informed. In any case, this is the most significant response yet to the oil price collapse and could set in motion a series of other mergers as IOCs seek to keep paying dividends they may no longer afford. Indeed, reducing capital investment, embarking on a new round of cost-cutting, and either turn to the debt market or sell assets, are all measures that are no longer sufficient. Finally, as little time was left to discuss what to expect from the upcoming climate summit, we concluded that a lasting agreement will predictably hinge on whatever direction the US and China would have agreed. Therefore, any such an agreement is likely to be weak. We also expected that a no-deal scenario could have serious consequences for investment in renewables and low-carbon energy technologies.
Connect with me on <www.linkedin.com/in/aliaissaoui>
Ali Aissaoui, Senior Consultant
Economics & Research

Tel
:         +966 13 859 7138
Mobile:
+966 50 580 1584
Email   : aaissaoui@apicorp-arabia.com
www.apicorp-arabia.com  

Contribution de Monsieur Aissaoui « I have just returned from Paris »

I have just returned from France where I participated in the spring meeting of the Paris Energy Club to brainstorm on the following:
•             The future of transportation fuels;
•             The changing geopolitics of energy;
•             Current energy-related issues.
As usual, the Club’s social evening, which was sponsored by IFP Energy Nouvelles, included a taste of Paris’ cultural and culinary distinctions.
The following three points constitute my personal take of the Club’s full-day discussion, which was conducted under Chatham House rule of non-attribution.
First, the transportation sector – across all transport modes – remains largely dominated by oil with road vehicles continuing to be powered almost exclusively by internal-combustion engines (ICEs) that are fuelled by petroleum products. However, we realized that signs of changes are ubiquitous – from continuing improvement in fleet-wide fuel economy, to alternative fuels, to rapidly evolving technology for electric cars. In the latter field, while long-range electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids remain very much in play, the smart car market is growing rapidly, with the extraordinary emergence of Tesla having the most serious impact on traditional automotive. Progress is expected to be even more spectacular when looking at the way digital technologies will drive mobility in the future. Our attention was invited to the fact that there are already examples of innovation such as the one supported by the so-called GAFA (Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon) that are making their mark on the way people travel, particularly in urban cities. Despite the huge uncertainties associated with disruptive technologies and innovation industries, the potential threat to oil is real and could be far-reaching.
Second, a new geopolitics of energy has emerged in the wake of the dramatic shift in energy investment and trade of recent years with a consequent reshaping of international politics. We first discussed, but passed over undecided, the question of whether or not OPEC (and Saudi Arabia) can regain their role as global swing producers in face of shale oil’s incremental economics, lean structure and flexible business model. As we shifted focus to the complex dynamics in Eurasia, we noted how, “East of Baku”, China and Russia are calling the shots and wondered what the Western world could do to balance Beijing and Moscow, hopefully through win-win propositions to reduce geopolitical tensions. We further took note of President Xi’s “One Belt One Road” strategy – probably one of China’s most important foreign policy initiatives – and its declared ambition of contributing to the development of China and the rest of the world in the areas of energy, trade and culture. The energy security implications of the initiative (the energy connectivity along both the Silk Road Economic Belt One and the 21 century Maritime Silk Road call for major investments in energy infrastructure), could lead to a more assertive role of China in global energy security.
Third, in discussing current and upcoming issues, we focused on how Big Oil is coping with the price collapse and what is at stake at the Paris December climate summit. In past depressed oil market environments, IOCs bought their way out of trouble through mergers. Until recently this was considered unlikely to happen again on the ground that the last such mergers – at the end of the 1990s and early 2000s – failed to create new opportunities for long-term growth. But Shell’s just-announced acquisition of BG has come as no surprise to the better informed. In any case, this is the most significant response yet to the oil price collapse and could set in motion a series of other mergers as IOCs seek to keep paying dividends they may no longer afford. Indeed, reducing capital investment, embarking on a new round of cost-cutting, and either turn to the debt market or sell assets, are all measures that are no longer sufficient. Finally, as little time was left to discuss what to expect from the upcoming climate summit, we concluded that a lasting agreement will predictably hinge on whatever direction the US and China would have agreed. Therefore, any such an agreement is likely to be weak. We also expected that a no-deal scenario could have serious consequences for investment in renewables and low-carbon energy technologies.
Connect with me on <www.linkedin.com/in/aliaissaoui>
Ali Aissaoui, Senior Consultant
Economics & Research

Tel
:         +966 13 859 7138
Mobile:
+966 50 580 1584
Email   : aaissaoui@apicorp-arabia.com
www.apicorp-arabia.com  

Interview de Mr ATTAR Abdelmadjid sur le journal La Tribune du 20 avril 2015

Téléchargez le document : LA TRIBUNE 20.04.2015(1)

Revue AIG NEWS N°2

Télécharger :AIGnews2

Journée d’étude sur les techniques de protection De l’environnement dans le développement du gaz de schiste

 

08 Avril 2015 Journée d'etude A I G 001

08 Avril 2015 Journée d'etude A I G Golder photo  interview Attar copie

 

Journée d’étude sur les techniques de protection

De l’environnement dans le développement du gaz de schiste

(Alger 08 Avril 2015)

CLÔTURE ET CONCLUSIONS DE LA JOURNÉE D’ÉTUDE

Par Mr. Abdelmadjid Attar, V.P. de l’AIG

Tout d’abord je tiens au nom de l’AIG et de l’ensemble des participants à adresser nos sincères remerciements aux experts de GOLDER qui ont accepté notre invitation, en venant parfois de loin et pour la première fois en Algérie, de pays divers, pour partager avec nous leurs expériences à l’international sur le thème de notre journée d’études.

Une journée très riche d’enseignements, un débat très intéressant et d’actualité.

Qu’on le veuille ou non il est clair que les hydrocarbures conventionnels ou non, sont au cœur de toutes les stratégies énergétiques à l’échelle mondiale pour plusieurs raisons dont les plus importantes sont les suivantes :

  • Une préoccupation générale en matière de sécurité énergétique à long terme.
  • Une ressource naturelle non renouvelable et à priori pour les hydrocarbures non conventionnels une ressource pouvant assurer un complément majeur dans la transition énergétique qui est en train de faire son petit chemin à travers le monde entier.
  • L’objet d’enjeux géostratégiques et géopolitiques, autant à travers la possession de la ressource que de son contrôle.
  • Et enfin une préoccupation majeure des sociétés civiles du fait des impacts environnementaux qu’on prête à cette ressource.

Les trois premières raisons ont un caractère économique et politique, qui n’a pas fait partie de notre débat d’aujourd’hui, et il aurait fallu consacrer une journée complète à ces aspects.

La quatrième raison a un caractère sociétal, qui fait que l’opinion publique est automatiquement amenée à s’emparer du dossier à travers une multitude de débats qui ne sont pas hélas tous homogènes ou complémentaires, parce que les craintes exprimées, les opinions ou les techniques / solutions avancées d’un pays à un autre, parfois dans le même pays,sont hélas extrêmement divergentes.

Le problème est par conséquent aujourd’hui de réfléchir à la manière d’organiser le débat autour de cette ressource : comment ?Dans quel cadre ?Entre qui et sur quelle base de données ?

C’est pour toutes ces raisons que l’AIG a commencé à travailler sur ce sujet dès 2011 en organisant en 2012 à Oran notre premier workshop sur le gaz de schiste, auquel ont participé de nombreux experts algériens et d’autres venus de plusieurs pays. Nous continuons à le faire de façon très sereine à travers nos participations aux réflexions dans le cadre de l’Union Internationale du Gaz, ou d’actions spécifiques en matière d’échange d’informations, de retour d’expériences à travers le monde, et bien sûr de débat à caractère technique et scientifique entre experts et opérateurs gaziers.

C’est ce qui nous ainsi amené à organiser cette journée d’étude en collaboration avec des experts, cette fois ci dans le domaine des techniques de protection de l’environnement dans le développement du gaz de schiste, puisque c’est ce volet qui est de nos jours au cœur de tous les débats aussi bien en Algérie qu’à travers le monde entier.

Nous aurons j’espère aussi l’occasion d’organiser d’autres journées d’études sur les volets techniques et économiques, mais je dois tout de suite préciser que l’AIG n’est qu’un espace d’échange de données, d’expériences, de progrès, pour le développement de l’industrie du gaz naturel en général, et non celle qui doit décider de l’exploitation de telle ou telle ressource, ou de la stratégie gazière ou énergétique à mettre en œuvre.

Pour revenir au contenu et aux résultats de notre journée d’échange, j’aimerai commencer par poser les questions suivantes :

  • Qu’avons-nous appris aujourd’hui ?
  • Quelles sont les questions, les préoccupations, ou les problèmes que nous avons abordés aujourd’hui ?
  • Quelles sont les précisions, les éclairages ou les réponses à retenir aussi ?

Une première piste très particulière nous a été proposée pour dire que :« LES RESSOURCES NON CONVENTIONNELLES NÉCESSITENT D’Y PENSER DE FAÇON NON CONVENTIONNELLE ».

La matinée a en effet été consacrée à la revue des différents impacts environnementaux potentiels à chaque stade de l’exploration et de l’exploitation du gaz de schiste. Nous avons pu constater que les principaux impacts sont liés à :

  • La forte densité d’occupation des sols (surfaces).
  • L’usage de l’eau en matière de volume et de charge par une dizaine de produits chimiques.
  • La technologie de fracturation hydraulique utilisée actuellement.
  • L’éventuel risque de contamination des eaux souterraines.
  • La gestion des rejets en surface en cours de production et les éventuels impacts sur l’environnement de façon générale (population, sol, végétation, air).

Tous ces impacts ont été abordés à travers les exposés des experts, ont fait l’objet de questions, de réponses, et nous aussi pu prendre connaissance des différents apprentissages propres à chaque pays.

Au cours de l’après-midi nous avons pu aussi passer en revue les expériences de plusieurs pays en matière de pratiques de gestion des aspects environnementaux et sociaux.

On peut donc résumer cet important retour d’expérience par les principales questions, réponses, remarques, et recommandations suivantes :

1- En ce qui concerne les opportunités de développement du gaz de schiste, que ce soit en Algérie ou ailleurs, il est évident que les évaluations du potentiel, même si la plupart sont préliminaires et non certifiées, indiquent la présence d’hydrocarbures non conventionnels en volumes importants dans le sous-sol (volumes de ressources en place). Le poids des hydrocarbures conventionnels dans les modèles de consommation énergétique et l’économie de certains pays producteurs pour plusieurs décennies encore, ainsi que le déclin annoncé de ce type de réserves à moyen ou long terme, nécessite tout l’intérêt à accorder aux hydrocarbures non conventionnels dans les meilleurs délais.

2- Pour ce qui est des risques et des impacts, nous avons pu constater qu’il y a déjà un historique et des expériences, issues aussi bien des hydrocarbures conventionnels ou non conventionnels que des autres activités industrielles (Énergie, Mines, etc…). Ils définissent parfaitement et ont permis d’améliorer de façon continue non seulement les techniques de prévention, de gestion des impacts, mais aussi la réglementation nécessaire en la matière qui évolue de façon conséquente dans tous les pays.

3-En ce qui concerne la protection des ressources en eau et la rationalisation de leur usage, nous avons pu aussi remarquer que d’énormes progrès ont été faits dans ce domaine sur le plan technologique et réglementaire. Le seul problème qui demeure d’un pays à un autre et même d’une région à une autre au sein d’un même pays relève d’un nécessaire arbitrage en fonction des besoins, des ressources disponibles, et des affectations des ressources ou de leur contre valeur (rente). C’est un choix qui n’est pas toujours facile, mais nécessaire selon le contexte énergétique ou économique du pays.

4- Pour ce qui est des risques de contamination des eaux, des sols, et de l’air, le problème est surtout lié à la nécessité d’une réglementation stricte, imposant le traitement des rejets liquides, solides ou gazeux. Nous avons pu constater ce matin que les 10 produits chimiques actuellement utilisés comme additifs ne sont pas aussi polluants qu’on le croit ou qu’on laisse croire. Il n’existe aujourd’hui aucun cas documenté de contamination des eaux souterraines suite à une opération de fracturation hydraulique, ni aucun cas révélé de possible prolongement de fracture jusqu’en surface y compris de façon indirecte à travers des fractures préexistantes. Les études et la modélisation géologiques et sismiques préalables permettent de contrôler parfaitement l’étendue des fractures à créer.                                             Quant aux éventuels impacts qui peuvent survenir en surface, ils ne sont pas différents de ceux connus dans l’exploitation des hydrocarbures conventionnels, ont tous une solution qui repose sur l’obligation de traitement des rejets, et ont bien sur un cout à prendre en considération dans le calcul économique qui précède toujours la décision d’exploiter ou non les hydrocarbures non conventionnels.

5- Quant au choix des technologies de fracturation, et au contrôle des opérations, le problème et sa solution sont tout simplement de nature technologique. Il est vrai que la totalité des technologies sont importées en Algérie comme dans tous les autres pays, et c’est aussi un cout qu’il faut simplement intégrer au calcul de rentabilité comme le traitement des rejets. Il y a bien sur des techniques alternatives à l’utilisation de l’eau, mais aucune d’entre elles n’a prouvé à ce jour son efficacité tant technique qu’économique.

6- Le 6ème point concerne la nécessité d’accepter, d’organiser, et de promouvoir le débat autour de l’opportunité d’exploiter ou non les hydrocarbures non conventionnels. Cet aspect est aussi important que tous ceux qui précèdent, qu’ils soient d’ordre environnemental ou économique. C’est ce que l’AIG essaie de promouvoir depuis 2012, en fournissant les éclairages nécessaires, en organisant des échanges d’expériences, en participant elle-même aux débats et aux études à l’échelle mondiale au sein de l’UIG, et bien sur en valorisant tout cela au sein de journées d’études comme celle d’aujourd’hui.

7- Le dernier point aurait pu être celui qui consisterait à répondre à la question suivante : l’Algérie doit elle ou non s’engager ou se préparer à une éventuelle exploitation du gaz de schiste ? Nous avons pris connaissance cet après midi de trois expériences que nous pouvons résumer ainsi :

POLOGNE 

  • Potentiel non conventionnel le plus intéressant en Europe, et besoins énergétiques en croissance.
  • 68 puits réalisés à ce jour dont 13 horizontaux fracturés.
  • Roche mère profonde entre 3 et 6.000 mètres.
  • Résultats préliminaires décevants en matière de réserves et de production.
  • Aucune production actuelle.
  • Principal problème rencontré lié à l’occupation des sols et à la ressource hydrique dont la réglementation est très stricte.
  • Opérations en surface très complexes et couteuses (acquisition de sismique, accès aux terrains, routes, nuisances par rapport à la population et à la couverture végétale/agricole).
  • Prépondérance du charbon dans le modèle de production/consommation énergétique.
  • Mais poursuite de l’évaluation avec beaucoup de progrès pour faire face aux difficultés énumérées.

     AFRIQUE DU SUD

  • Potentiel non conventionnel relativement intéressant en Afrique, et besoins énergétiques en croissance.
  • Absence de tradition pétrolière ou gazière.
  • Absence de moyens technologiques et logistiques.
  • Absence d’infrastructures nécessaires pour valoriser une éventuelle exploitation (Pipes, stockage, usage industriel du gaz)
  • Absence de régulation propre aux hydrocarbures.
  • Prépondérance du charbon dans le modèle de production/consommation énergétique.
  • D’où la décision d’un moratoire de 3 ans pour préparer le cadre nécessaire à l’exploitation de cette ressource.

ÉTATS UNIS

  • Potentiel conventionnel en déclin.
  • Potentiel non conventionnel énorme.
  • Capacités technologiques dominantes dans le monde.
  • Industries et infrastructures gazières (amont et aval)les plus importantes au monde.
  • Besoins énergétiques les plus importants au monde.
  • Stratégie basée sur l’indépendance et la sécurité énergétique.
  • Régulation en progrès constant pour les hydrocarbures non conventionnels.
  • D’où la position de premier producteur de gaz non conventionnel depuis 2008.

ET L’ALGÉRIE DANS TOUT CA ?

  • On ne peut certainement pas se comparer aux USA, mais il y a des similitudes relatives.
  • L’Algérie a une tradition et une industrie, ainsi que des infrastructures pétrolières et gazières.
  • L’Algérie renferme aussi un potentiel non conventionnel très important, mais qui nécessite d’être évalué sur 3 plans : Technique, Environnemental, et économique.
  • L’Algérie a hélas une économie et un modèle de consommation énergétique dépendant exclusivement des hydrocarbures.CE N’EST LE CAS NI DE LA POLOGNE NI DE L’AFRIQUE DU SUD dont les modèle de consommation énergétique repose sur le charbon, et l’économie sur d’autres activités (agriculture, mines et industrie).

Les expériences issues de plusieurs pays, les études et les données disponibles mettent en évidence que l’énergie et plus précisément l’indépendance énergétique, est un facteur essentiel dans la stratégie de tous les pays.                                          La présence ou l’absence de potentiel en hydrocarbures ainsi que le modèle économique en présence sont d’autre part les deux facteurs de base qui pèsent dans la décision de développer ou non les hydrocarbures non conventionnels, et le processus de mise en œuvre. D’où la différence entre un pays et un autre en matière de transition énergétique à adopter.

L’Algérie est caractérisée par des avantages mais aussi des inconvénients :

  • Des réserves conventionnelles appréciables mais non renouvelables et appelées a décliner a moyen et long terme.
  • Des ressources non conventionnelles importantes mais qui nécessitent une évaluation urgente pour en apprécier l’exploitabilité en fonction des technologies et des moyens disponibles.
  • Une économie très dépendante delà rente hydrocarbures.
  • Un potentiel en énergies renouvelables (solaire surtout) exceptionnel, mais un modèle de consommation énergétique basé pour le moment presque exclusivement sur les hydrocarbures.

La mise en œuvre d’une transition énergétique et économique nécessite par conséquent de multiples arbitrages à moyen terme, ainsi que l’évaluation et l’exploitation de toutes les ressources énergétiques sans exception, dans une optique de sécurité énergétique à long terme.

Accès espace membres du bureau et les membres du conseil

You are not logged in.

Accès pour les membres

You are not logged in.

Accès Commissions

You are not logged in.

Newsletter

Inscrivez-vous à la newsletter et recevez la lettre mensuelle de l’AIG